Trippin with Diabetes

Tags: Diabetes, packing, prepared, supplies, trip, vacation

Before I really paid attention to my diabetes about 5 years ago, I didn’t even own a functional meter. I was really bad, but since really coming into the light about my diabetes, there isn’t anywhere I go without it. Even if I am just running down to the corner store to pick up some milk, my messenger bag with all my supplies comes with me. I may be a little to anal about always having it with me but maybe I am just compensating for all the years I was so bad.

To each his own. Everyone is different.

Well, being prepared and always having what you need, and sometimes what you don’t need, does not pertain to just your day to day life. For those who follow my blog, you know that I am soon to be heading to Cabo for 5 days. In addition, at the end of the month, I will also be headed to the Roche Diabetes Social Media Summit and staying a few extra days for the CWD conference in Orlando Florida. Now with taking trips, you do not always have easy access to Diabetes supplies in case you run out or something gets damaged, so planning is crucial to keep from cutting your trip, or in extreme cases your life, short. Not my 2nd trip, while still important to be prepared, I will have many, many people to fall back on in case something were to happen since I will be surrounded by Diabetics. So, I am going to focus a little more on my Cabo trip.

For me, Cabo is a trip that I never know if I will get the chance to do again, so I am very excited about it and want to make the most of every moment. In order to do that, my Diabetes must be on point. My control as well and my needs much be scrutinized to the point of obsession. Cabo is in Mexico, which means that I will be out of the country. For me, at least in my head, this means that extra Diabetes supplies will be non-existent.

Therefore, I must prepare for the worst and hope for the best.

In breaking down what I will need for the trip, I have come up with the following checklist to make sure I have everything:

Cabo 5 Day Diabetes Checklist:

  • Apidra Insulin: 2 bottles
  • Infusion sets: 1 box (10 sets)
  • Reservoirs: 1 box (20 reservoirs)
  • Batteries: 4 pack of AAA (insulin pump > CGMS charger) 2-pack watch batteries (OneTouch Ultra Mini replacements)
  • CGMS Sensors: 5 (still debating on if I will even use them but….)
  • IV-3000 adhesive patches: 1 box (its easier just to bring the box than to pull out a bunch and have them loose)
  • Accu-Check Multi-click Lancets: 2 (I rarely change the lancet anyways but better to be safe than sorry)
  • Insulin pump: 2 pumps (I still have my old pump that I need to trade in so bringing it as a backup)v
  • Meters: 2-3 OneTouch Ultra Minis (I have one in each color so can’t hurt to have too many)
  • Test Strips: 100 strips (4 bottles)
  • Syringes: 1 Package (10 syringes –  in case something were to go wrong with the Pump)
  • Glucose Tablets: 3 travel rolls and 1 large bottle
  • Gucogon Shot: 1 (its better to be safe than sorry)
  • So, I think this is my complete list. For me, I try and make sure I have at least double the amount of supplies I would need for a trip. Of course not the case for the pump supplies. For me just taking a box of each is just easier than carrying a bunch of loose supplies and you never know when you are going to have multiple bad site changes. So, like I said before, better to be safe than sorry.

    Another thing that I think that is important when preparing for a trip is to separate your supplies into two “stashes.” Half in one and half in another because you never know what could happen to your bags during travel. The plane may ship your baggage to the wrong place. a bag could get lost or forgotten, bag(s) could be stolen. There are numerous things that could happen. So, if you can put matching supplies into multiple bags, you limit the possibilities of running into issues with your supplies. There is no way to be 100% prepared for unfortunate circumstances when going on a trip, but if you plan ahead, you can limit the negative effects of those circumstances.

    Insulin pump in your pocket?

    Or are you just carrying a circa 1985 pager?

    Don’t get me wrong, I love my Animas Ping, but there are definitely times when I wish there was a little less of it to love. Everyone who I work with directly knows that I have diabetes.  I’ve never had any urge to hide it, and even if

    I wanted to, I think it would be nearly impossible considering the ridiculously long hours I work with these  people.  All the same, I’d rather not broadcast my ‘beetus to everyone else I run into in the course of the work day.

    This is where Strategic Pump Placement ™ should come in.  I am a master of securing my pump to the inside of the waist bands of skirts, smuggling it in my bra and occasionally hiding it in a sock and running the tubing through the leg of my pants a la Kerri at Six Until Me.  The problem with all of these places? Access.  I know my Ping has a remote, and when my pump is stashed somewhere stealthy because I’m wearing a “date-night” dress, I make good use of it.

    But when I’m facing a major project at the office?  When I’m on hour number 10 of what will probably end up being 20 hours of solid work?  When I haven’t seen my own office since sometime before lunch because I’ve been in one meeting after another and it’s now well after dinnertime?  On days like that I need to be able to deal with the device that’s attached to me and not the one I forgot back on my desk, preferably without fishing around in my shirt.

    So what’s a girl to do?  At a certain point, I decided that having the occasional coworker or client comment on me “wearing a blackberry like the IT guy!” is far better than looking like I’m feeling myself up in a meeting or suffering from a severe case of disco boobs.